Negotiation styles in Denmark

Written by Josafath, Jeroen Filius January 2014. Posted in Int. Skills, Negotiations

Negotiation styles in Denmark

Danish counterparts will most likely have a structured and organized approach when it comes to doing business. Morrison & Conaway (2006) note that, in most cases, your Danish counterpart will like to start negotiations with very little small talk. Thus, business topics will start soon after the start of negotiations. To the Danes it could be an effective bargaining tactic if you open with written offers, terms and conditions. This will shorten the process which your Danish counterpart will aim for. The Danes will tend to end negotiations with a win-win situation. Therefore, both parties will be equal to each other and have their own responsibility to reach an agreement. The same approach may be seen when it comes to short- and long-term benefits; to the Danes the focus will be equally divided.
The negotiation style which is mostly seen while doing business with the Danish is collaborative. Your Danish counterpart may be collaborative towards compromising if this seems helpful in the negotiation process.
As mentioned above, the Danes tend to have a joint problem solving style of negotiation. Therefore, your Danish counterpart expects you to appreciate and equally return their trust and respect. Bear in mind to avoid any open confrontation and by all means stay calm, patient and friendly. Subjective feelings and emotions do not play a major role in negotiations with the Danish and can even be frowned upon which can have a negative effect on reaching an agreement. Try to focus on the subject of negotiation should a conflict arise at any stage of doing business.

Communication style
Sabath (2004) refers to a direct and the upright way of expressing opinion while doing business with your Danish counterparts. This is not to be offensive; it is simply their way of communicating with you. Keep in mind that this kind of communication also counts when using negotiation techniques. According to both Morrison & Conaway (2006) and Katz (2006) deceptive negotiation techniques, such as not telling the truth or the use of fake nonverbal communication, could have a negative effect. This will harm the trust between you and your Danish counterpart and could jeopardize your agreement. The use of pressure techniques is more common, such as starting with your final offers. While using these kind of techniques always keep calm and avoid being angry or aggressive. However, it is best to open with an offer that is somewhere in line with what you really want and start negotiation from this point. Try to avoid any emotional negotiation techniques or small talk about personal relationships while doing business with your Danish counterparts.
Bargaining will mostly take a short amount of time and will not have a huge impact on the final offer. Also keep in mind that Danes like a win-win situation at the end of negotiations, so when it comes to bargaining an exchange that is too one-sided is disliked.