Management styles in Argentina

Written by Daniël Dam, Ricardo van der Himst, Dirk Boogaarts January 2014. Posted in Leadership, Int. Skills

Management styles in Argentina

In Argentina, managers tend to be more people-oriented and less task-oriented (Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner, 1997). Hierarchy is important, and the person who is higher in rank or older should always be shown respect and be addressed with the right title. While it is a hierarchical country, managers should invest time in building relationships with their subordinates. It is important for a manager to gain the trust of his/her subordinates in order to gain their loyalty. It is also important for managers to be genuine and take a real interest in their subordinates’ work , according to Lawrence W. Tuller (2008).
An effective leader is able to present ideas and information concretely. To do so cogently, a leader is expected to tell where an idea is coming from and be willing to compare his or her idea with alternatives. Managers should try to acknowledge and include the work from their subordinates, as to recognize that the manager cares about their input.

Decision making
A senior manager can make decisions by personal preference. Often personal views and events in the decision-makers life will influence the decision. Other things that can involve a decision are politics and faith. A leader needs to be determinant, because decisions are dictated and generally won’t be based on consensus. In short, decision-making in Argentina is hierarchical and centralised, concludes Becker (2004).

Hierarchy
Hierarchy is rather apparent in Argentina. Managers are aware of their power, and they expected to be respected by their subordinates, simply because a higher hierarchical position. Usually a senior makes a decision without consultation or agreement of subordinates. Argentines work well in teams when the hierarchy is clear and when they all have the same goal to reach as Tuller (2008) confirms.
If we zoom in on employee motivation in Argentinean corporations Diran (2009) researched that the main motivational factors are remuneration and in-company acknowledgement of achievements.
In Argentina, feedback needs to be given in a more tactful manner. Negative feedback to a subordinate ideally is done in private (Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner, 1997).